The 

Vietnam War

The Vietnam War

$150 for 5 weeks

Teacher

Allison Bruning

Textbook

We will be using "The Americans" by McDougal Littell. ISBN: 0-395-85182-3. This textbook is available on Thriftbooks.

Homework

Homework assignments are given through Classcraft. Students will have 4 - 8 assignments per week that build from simple to complex. The homework listed below is the final assignment (complex one) for that week in Classcraft. 

Project

In the 1960s and early 1970s, the American people viewed images of the Vietnam War and its effects in newspapers, magazines, and on television. Many of these images have remained forever in the minds of those who saw them. Students will create a poster that graphically depicts an aspect of the Vietnam War. They will focus on a particular theme or time period of the war, using ideas presented in this course and images and scenes from outside resources. Students should consider the following as they develop their poster:

  • Look for photographs of the war in newspapers, microfilm, magazines and books from their local library.

  • Look for appropriate quotes from veterans and government leaders.

  • Search the internet for information about the war. 

  • Use a computer to create captions.

  • Experiment with arrangements of the visual images, quotes, and captions before affixing them to the poster.

  • Add hand-drawn or painted designs or images to the poster.

The student will be required to present their poster in the last session. They will need to take a picture of their poster and turn it in before their presentation.

 

Subjects

History

Ages

13 - 18  years old

   

Sessions

 

Session 1: Moving Toward Conflict

LESSON OBJECTIVES: 

Students will identify Ho Chi Minh, Vietminh, domino theory, Dien Bien Phu, Geneva Accords, Ngo Dinh Diem, Vietcong, Ho Chi Minh Trail, and Tonkin Gulf Resolution. 

Students will examine the life and contributions of Ho Chi Minh. 

Students will explain why the United States provided military aid to France.

Students will examine why the United States supported the cancellation of Vietnam's unifying elections.

Students will summarize why the Diem regime was so unpopular.

Students will analyze how the Tonkin Gulf Resolution lead to greater U.S. involvement in the Vietnam War.

HOMEWORK

1) Complete Section 1 Assessment on page 888.

2) Read pages 889 - 894 in course textbook.

3) Start your course project. 

Session 2: U.S. Involvement and Escalation

LESSON OBJECTIVES: 

Students will review their homework.

Students will identify Robert McNamara, Dean Rusk, William Westmoreland, napalm, Agent Orange, search-and-destroy mission, and credibility gap.

Students will examine the life and contributions of General William Westmoreland. 

Students will contrast the different opinions Johnson's advisers had about Vietnam.

Students will analyze land mines, tunnels of the Vietcong and Agent Orange.

Students will summarize why U.S. forces had difficulty fighting the Vietcong.

Students will analyze the factors that led to the low morale of U.S. troops.

Students will identify what led to the growing concern in America about the Vietnam War. 

HOMEWORK

1) Complete Section 3 Assessment on page 894.

2) Read pages 895 - 900 in course textbook.

3) Continue working on your course project. 

Session 3: A Nation Divided

LESSON OBJECTIVES: 

Students will review their homework.

Students will identify New Left, Students for a Democratic Society, Free Speech Movement, dove and hawk.

Students will explain why most American soldiers in Vietnam were minorities and lower class whites. 

Students will summarize the concerns the New Left movement voiced about American society. 

Students will examine the reasons protesters opposed the Vietnam War.

Students will contrast the different positions of the doves and hawks.

Students will analyze the problems Johnson faced with his escalation policy. 

HOMEWORK

1) Complete Section 3 Assessment on page 900.

2) Read pages 901 - 906 in course textbook.

3) Continue working on your course project. 

Session 4: 1968: A Tumultuous Year

LESSON OBJECTIVES: 

Students will review their homework. 

Students will identify Tet Offensive, Clark Clifford, Robert Kennedy, Eugene McCarthy, Hubert Humphrey, and George Wallace. 

Students will examine why American support for the war changed after the Tet Offensive.

Students will explain why President Johnson decided not to run again.

Students will analyze why 1968 was characterized as a of "lost control" in America. 

Students will summarize the factors that led to Nixon's victory.

HOMEWORK

1) Complete Section 4 Assessment on page 906.

2) Read pages 907 - 915 in course textbook.

3) Complete the Interact with History project on page 215

4) Continue working on your course project. You will present your project in the next session.

Session 5: The End of the War and Its Legacy

LESSON OBJECTIVES: 

Students will review their homework, present their Interact with History project and course project. 

Students will identify Vietnamization, silent majority, Pentagon Papers, Henry Kissinger, Khmer Rouge and War Powers Act.

Students will contrast U.S. Aerial Bomb Tonnage from previous wars and Vietnam War.

Students will summarize what Nixon hoped to achieve with "peace with honor" in Vietnam.

Students will analyze how campus shootings demonstrated the continued divisions within the United States.

Students will examine the life and contributions of Henry Kissinger.

Students will explain who the release of the Pentagon Papers might have hurt the Nixon administration's war effort in Vietnam.

Students will analyze how POWS/MIA from the Vietnam War have influenced modern day America.

Students will explain why the U.S. might have refused to reenter the Vietnam War. 

Students will summarize how the Vietnam War effected American attitudes.

Students will analyze literature from the Vietnam War.

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