The

Industrial 

Age

The Industrial Age

$120 for 4 weeks

Teacher

Allison Bruning

Textbook

We will be using "The Americans" by McDougal Littell. ISBN: 0-395-85182-3. This textbook is available on Thriftbooks.

Homework

Homework assignments are given through Classcraft. Students will have 4 - 8 assignments per week that build from simple to complex. The homework listed below is the final assignment (complex one) for that week in Classcraft. 

Project

Students will write a science fiction short story in which a society such as the of the United States in the mid-19th century does not experience industrialization: lack of natural resources, no creative ideas, or sparse population, for example, Then describe daily life in that society such as:

1) where people live

2) how they provide food and shelter for their families

3) what kind of social and cultural activities they engage in

Students will present their story in a creative way during the last session. 

Subjects

History

Ages

13 - 18  years old

   

Sessions

 

Session 1: The Expansion of Industry

LESSON OBJECTIVES: 

Students will identify Edwin L. Drake, Bessemer process, Thomas Alva Edison, Christopher Sholes, and Alexander Graham Bell.  

Students will summarize how the availability of raw materials influenced industrialization.  

Students will evaluate how Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania became a steel town. 

Students will analyze why 1826 - 1903 is considered a technological explosion.

Students will describe how electricity changed American life and how inventions affected American workers.

Students will identify the cause of the explosion of invention in the late 19th century. 

Students will analyze Thomas Alva Edison's invention of the light bulb. 

Students will describe how technology changed Cleveland, Ohio. 

Students will answer the following question and justify their answer with facts from the text or other resources.

1) What impact did Cleveland's industrial development have on its environment?

HOMEWORK

1) Complete Section 1 Assessment on page 413.

2) Read pages 416 - 420 in course textbook.

3) Complete the questions in the Interact with History on page 415.

4) Start your course project. 

Session 2: The Age of the Railroads

LESSON OBJECTIVES: 

Students will review their homework.

Students will identify transcontinental railroad, George M. Pullman, Credit Mobilier, Munn vs. Illinois, Interstate Commerce Act. 

Students will analyze railroad lore and those who opposed railroads in literature. 

Students will contrast the positive and negative aspects of railroad expansion.

Students will summarize how the development of industry might have been affected if the railroads had not existed.

Students will explain why the residents of the Pullman company town resent the company.

Students will describe how railroad owners used the Credit Mobilier company to make huge, undeserved profits. 

Students will summarize how the Grangers, who were largely poor farmers, did battle with the giant railroad companies. 

HOMEWORK

1) Complete Section 2 Assessment on page 393.

2) Read pages 421 - 425 in course textbook.

3) Continue working on your course project. 

Session 3: Big Business Emerges

LESSON OBJECTIVES: 

Students will review their homework.

Students will identify Andrew Carnegie, vertical integration, horizontal consolidation, Social Darwinism, monopoly, holding company, John D. Rockefeller, trust, and Sherman Antitrust Act. 

Students will summarize Andrew Carnegie's management techniques.

Students will describe how Andrew Carnegie's life symbolized the american success story.

Students will examine how Darwin's theory of evolution affected 19th century economic policy. 

Students will summarize the strategies enabled by big business to eliminate competition.

Students will analyze how John. D. Rockefeller became successful. 

Students will answer the following question and justify their answer with facts from the text or other resources.

1) Do you agree with Carnegie's defense of millionaires? Why or why not?

Students will explain how economic factors limited industrialization in the South

HOMEWORK

1) Complete Section 3 Assessment on page 425.

2) Read pages 426 - 433 in course textbook.

3) Complete the questions in the Interact with History on page 424.

4) Continue working on your course project. You will present your project in the next session. 

 

Session 4: Workers of the Nation Unite

LESSON OBJECTIVES: 

Students will review their homework and present their projects.

Students will identify Samuel Gompers, American Federation of Labor (AFL), collective bargaining, Eugene V. Debs, socialism, Industrial Workers of the World (IWW), scab, and Mary Harris "Mother" Jones

Students will summarize how industrial working conditions contributed to the growth of the labor movement. 

Students will analyze how racial inequality affected the founding of labor parties.

Students will answer the following question and justify their answer with facts from the text or other resources.

1) How have times changed for working teens?

Students will contrast craft unionism and industrial unionism. 

Students will summarize how socialists worked within the labor movement.

Students will describe one major effect of the Haymarket Affair.

Students will explain how strikes threatened industry.

Students will summarize the tactics women organizers used to achieve labor reforms.

Students will explain why labor unions started to decline in the 1890's.

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