Classical Greece

(2000 B.C. - 300 B.C.)

Classical Greece

$150 for 5 weeks

Teacher

Allison Bruning

Textbook

We will be using "World History: Patterns of Interaction, Student Edition Survey" by Holt McDougal. ISBN: 978-0547491127. This textbook is available on Amazon.

Homework

Homework assignments are given through Classcraft. Students will have 4 - 8 assignments per week that build from simple to complex. The homework listed below is the final assignment (complex one) for that week in Classcraft. 

Subjects

History

Ages

12 - 18  years old

   

Sessions

 

Session 1: Cultures of the Mountains and the Sea

LESSON OBJECTIVES: 

Students will identify Mycenaen, Trojan War, Dorian, Homer, epic, and myth. 

Students will analyze what art tells us about Greek culture.

Students will analyze how Greece's location by the sea and its mountains lands affected its development. 

Students will explain how contact with Minoans affected Mycenaean culture. 

HOMEWORK

1) Complete Section 1 Assessment and Connect to Today on page 126.

2) Read pages 127 - 133 in course textbook.

Session 2: Warring City-States

LESSON OBJECTIVES: 

Students will review their homework.

Students will identify polis, acropolis, monarchy, aristocracy, oligarchy, tyrant, democracy, helot, phalanx, and Persian Wars. 

Students will contrast how Athenian democracy differed from American democracy. 

Students will compare/contrast monarchy, aristocracy, oligarchy and direct democracy. 

Students will analyze an excerpt from Greek historian, Xenophon's The Economist. 

Students will summarize the historical and culture importance of Greek festivals and sports. 

Students will compare the ideals of Spartan and Athenian societies. 

Students will analyze modern marathons.

Students will summarize how the Persian Wars affected the Greek people, especially the Athenians. 

HOMEWORK

1) Complete Section 2 Assessment and Multimedia Activity on page 133.

2) Read pages 134 - 141 in course textbook.

Session 3: Democracy and Greece's Golden Age

LESSON OBJECTIVES: 

Students will review their homework.

Students will identify direct democracy, classical art, tragedy, comedy, Peloponnesian War, philosopher, Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle. 

Students will compare/contrast Athenian and American democracy. 

Students will analyze how accurate Pericles' statement that Athenian democracy was in the hands of "the whole people".

Students will summarize the life and historical contributions of Pericles, Socrates, Plato and Aristotle. 

Students will contrast the differences between tragedy and comedy. 

Students will analyze Pericles' goals in the Peloponnesian War. 

Students will infer why philosophers started questioning traditional beliefs during a particular time in Athenian history.

Students will examine Greek art and architecture. 

HOMEWORK

1) Complete Section 3 Assessment and Connect to Today on page 139.

2) Read pages 142 - 145 in course textbook.

Session 4: Alexander's Empire

LESSON OBJECTIVES: 

Students will review their homework.

Students will identify Philip II, Macedonia, Alexander the Great, and Darius III. 

Students will analyze how the Peloponnesian War paved the way for Philip's conquest of Greece. 

Students will summarize the life and historical contributions of Alexander. 

Students will explain why Alexander continued his conquests after Darius had died.

Students will summarize the growth and decline of Alexander's empire. 

Students will hypothesize was the power struggle that followed Alexander's death inevitable.  

HOMEWORK

1) Complete Section 4 Assessment and Connect to Today on page 145.

2) Read pages 146 - 149 in course textbook.

Session 4: The Spread of Hellenistic Culture

LESSON OBJECTIVES: 

Students will review their homework.

Students will identify Hellenistic, Alexandria, Euclid, Archimedes, and Colossus of Rhodes. 

Students will examine the Greek's beliefs of astronomy and the Pythagorean Theorem. 

Students will summarize the main achievements of the scientists of the Hellenistic period. 

Students will identify the main concern of the Stoic and Epicurean schools of philosophy.

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