Booth Truth Club

$160 per month

 1 session per week

 

 

 

Teachers

Allison Bruning 

 

Assignments

Student's argumentative essays will be published on the Academic Warriors blog. 

 

Subjects

Writing, History

 

Ages

10 - 14 years old

   

Sessions

 

Session 1: Introduction to Argumentative Writing

LESSON OBJECTIVES: 

Students will compare/contrast persuasive and argumentative writing.

Students will examine the different parts of an argumentative essay. 

Students will explain how bias, misconceptions and prejudice can influence the writing of an argumentative essay.

Students will compare/contrast archaeologist, historian and preservationist. 

Students will describe the techniques one uses when taking notes and writing a summary.

HOMEWORK

Students will interview historian, Nate Orlowek, about what life is like as a historian. Students will write a summary of their interview and share the results with the class in the next session.

Sessions 2-3: What History Teaches Us

LESSON OBJECTIVES: 

Students will present their homework to the class.

Students will describe the effective research methods and steps needed to write an argumentative essay that contains facts, shows no bias, and uses acceptable resources to back up their information. 

Students will examine the facts surrounding the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln, the attempted assassination of Secretary of State William H. Seward and the manhunt for John Wilkes Booth. 

Sessions 4-5: Nate Orlowek's Alternative Theory

LESSON OBJECTIVES: 

Students will examine the theory constructed by Nate Orlowek and his research team that John Wilkes Booth was not killed in Garrick's Barn. 

Students will examine primary and secondary sources including scientific research results conducted for Nate Orlowek's research.

HOMEWORK

Students will interview historian, Nate Orlowek, about his theory that John Wilkes Booth survived Garrick's Barn. 

Session 6-8: Constructing Your Argumentative Essay

LESSON OBJECTIVES: 

Students will form their own hypothesis of what they believed happened to John Wilkes Booth using evidence they have obtained to back up their hypothesis.

Students will construct an outline for their argumentative essay. 

Students will use their outline to compose their argumentative essays.

Booth Truth

Club