Ancient 

Greece

Ancient Greece

$360 for 12 weeks

Teacher

Allison Bruning 

Subjects

History

Ages

11 - 15  years old

   

Sessions

 

Session 1: The Geography of Greece

LESSON OBJECTIVES: 

Students will define peninsula, Peloponnesus, isthmus, Phoenician, alphabet, and harbor.

Students will describe the main features of the geography of Greece.

Students will explain what caused much of the soil on mainland Greece to be thin and rocky.

Students will describe how the mountains affect inland travel, life and trade in ancient Greece.

Students will explain why the ancient Greeks started most of their settlements near the coasts.

Students will describe how the sea helped the Greek economy and affected daily life.

Students will explain how trade influenced Greek culture.

Students will examine the Cyclades and how ancient Greeks lived on these group of islands.

Students will examine the development of the Greek alphabet.

Students will identify what lead the early Greeks to trade with people in other parts of the Mediterranean region.

Students will describe what the ancient Greeks learned from trading with other people. 

HOMEWORK

Complete the Greekletter worksheet then write a letter to your family in Athens about your trip around Greece. What did you see? What was you favorite place to visit and why? Be sure to write it in Greek and include details about the geography of Greece. Use the alphabet listed on the bottom of the worksheet. You  may want to do some research on the internet, visit your library and review the notes from class. Be detailed as possible and ready to share your letter with the class in the next session. 

 

Session 2: Greek Gods

LESSON OBJECTIVES: 

Students will define Zeus, Mount Olympus, myth, Olympics, epic poem and fable.

Students will present their letter to the class. 

Students will summarize how the earth was created according the beliefs of the ancient Greeks.

Students will identify Mount Olympus on a map and explain why it was special to the Greeks.

Students will identify the twelve Olympian gods by their Greek and Roman names.

Students will describe what each Olympian god were responsible for, how they were created and how they are related.

HOMEWORK

Construct a biopoem about one of their favorite Greek Olympian gods using the worksheet that is given to them in class. You may need to do more research on the internet and/or the library.

Session 3: The Olympics

LESSON OBJECTIVES: 

Students will define Olympics

Students will present their biopoem to the class. 

Students will describe how ancient Greeks honored their gods. 

Students will explain why the ancient Greeks held the Olympics

HOMEWORK

What is your favorite modern Olympian sport? Create a poster about your sport. Be sure to include the name of the sport, when was it invented, how is it played or judged and any other important information about the sport. Be ready to present your poster to the class in the next session. 

 

Session 4: Mythology

LESSON OBJECTIVES: 

Students will define myth.

Students will present their poster to the class. 

Students will analyze the development of Hieroglyphs, Hieratic and Demotic forms of writing.

Students will explain how Greek myths and religion are connected. 

Students will describe how Greek mythology was important to everyday life of the ancient Greeks.

Students will perform and examine the reader's theatre Greek myth of "Hades and Persephone." 

Students will perform and examine the reader's theatre Greek myth of "Atalanta's Last Race." 

HOMEWORK

Create your own myth to explain some natural phenomenon or land formation. It could be anything from the origin of hurricanes to how the Grand Canyon or a mountain range was created. You will tell this myth in a story format. Follow the instructions that are provided to you. Be prepared to share your myth with the class in the next session.

Session 5: Early Greek Literature

LESSON OBJECTIVES: 

Students will define fable and epic poem.

Students will present their myths to the class. 

Students will identify Homer and why he is important to ancient history.

Students will describe the characters in Homer's "The Iliad" and "The Odyssey"

Students will summarize Homer's "The Iliad" and "The Odyssey"

Students will explain why Homer's epics are important.

Student swill identify Aesop and why he is important to ancient history.

Students will summarize the stories and lessons found in many of Aesop's fables.

HOMEWORK

Consider a moral lesson that is important to you. Write a fable using animals to teach that lesson. Be prepared to share your story with the class in the next session. 

Session 6: Early Civilization in Greece

LESSON OBJECTIVES: 

Students will define peasant, cultural borrowing, bard, legend, epic, myth and mythology.

Students will present their fable to the class. 

Students will explain what made Crete a pleasant place for Minoans to live. 

Students will identify the events that historians believe led to the end of Minoan civilization. 

Students will explain why the Mycenaeans are considered the first Greeks.

Students will examine how the location of Crete helped the Mycenaeans trade with other cultures. 

Students will describe the Greek Dark Age.

HOMEWORK

Complete the Minoan and Mycenaeans worksheets. 

Session 7: Greek City-States

LESSON OBJECTIVES: 

Students will define polis, acropolis, agora, oligarchy, tyrant, democracy, commerce, colony and tyrant.

Students will present their answers to the class. 

Students will describe how geography affected the development of Greek city-states.

Students will identify how Greece was organized politically.

Students will identify the role of the agora in a Greek city.

Students will describe the different political systems evolved in the city-states of Greece.

Students will compare/contrast oligarchy and aristocracy.

Students will identify what caused some tyrannies to transition, or change, into early democratic forms of government.

Students will describe the relationship between the locations of Greek colonies and trade routes. 

Students will identify what led Greek city-states to set up colonies.

Students will examine the development of the Greek alphabet. 

Students will explain how Homer's work helped connect Greeks to one another. 

Students will examine Hoplite warfare.

Students will explain why Greek city-states often fought among themselves.

HOMEWORK

Make a diorama of a part pf a Greek city-state. Show the relationship of the city to the outlying farms and to the sea. Be prepared to share your diorama with the class in the next session. 

Session 8: Sparta and Athens

LESSON OBJECTIVES: 

Students will define helot, assembly, reform, majority rule, fable, league, polis, aristocracy, oligarchy, tyrant, citizen and democracy.

Students will present their diorama to the class. 

Students will explain why the Spartans protected themselves with a military way of life. 

Students will explain why Spartan citizens were rarely allowed to travel outside Sparta.

Students will describe how Spartan education supported the military. 

Students will explain why Athen's poor people grew angry.

Students will identify the duties of an Athenian citizen.

Students will describe how limited democracy developed in Athens.

Students will identify Solon and why he is important to ancient history.

Students will summarize the significance, or importance, of Solon's reforms to the idea of citizenship. 

Students will contrast Athenian education for boys and girls.

HOMEWORK

Choose Your Own Adventure

Students will chose ONE of the projects listed below to complete for homework.

They should be ready to share their project with the class in the next session.

1) Suppose you live in ancient Athens or Sparta. Write a letter describing a typical day in your life. Be ready to present your letter to the class in the next session. 

OR

2) Use the internet to learn more about the Persian Wars. Then create one panel for a mural about the wars. Illustrate one battl eor another event. Be ready to preset your panel the class in the next session. 

Session 9: The Golden Age

LESSON OBJECTIVES: 

Students will define Pericles, direct democracy, Delian League, Acropolis and Parthenon.

Students will present their projects to the class. 

Students will explain what made the Greek city-states fear the Persian Empire.

Students will explain how the Persian Wars brought the Greek city-states together. 

Students will compare/contrast the roles of Athens and Sparta in the Persian Wars.

Students will compare/contrast direct democracy and a representative democracy. 

Students will explain how did the power of Athens expand.

Students will identify Pericles and why he is important to ancient history.

Students will describe the democratic changes Pericles brought. 

Students will explain how Pericles beautified Athens and how did he finance his program to do so.

Students will identify what contributed to the rise of the Golden Age in Athens. 

HOMEWORK

Choose Your Own Adventure

Students will chose ONE of the projects listed below to complete for homework.

They should be ready to share their project with the class in the next session.

1) Imagine that you are a newspaper reporter. Write three interview questions about early democracy, and then answer them as an expert. Write your response in the form of a newspaper article. Be ready to present your letter to the class in the next session. 

OR

2) Do some research on what buildings beside the Parthenon and the Erectheum were located on the Acropolis. Then draw a map sowing their location. Be ready to present your map to the class in the next session. 

Session 10: Greek Gifts

LESSON OBJECTIVES: 

Students will define tragedy, drama, ideal, philosophy and comedy.

Students will present their projects to the class. 

Students will describe the effect Greek mythology may have had upon art and architecture.

Students will identify the new elements that Greek art and architecture introduced. 

Students will identify the goal of Greek artists.

Students will analyze Greek architecture and identify Doric, Ionic and Corinthian columns.

Students will examine Greek theater.

Students will describe how the Greek literature of Homer influenced our literature and movies today.

Students will summarize the contributions Herodotus and Thucydides made to the recording of history. 

Students will describe the contributions Pythagoras, Hippocrates, Democritus, Herodotus, Thucydides and Socrates made.

Students will summarize how the Greek love of reason and logic influenced the development of Western thought. 

Students will explain why Hellenistic science is so important. 

Students will identify the areas of math and science in which Greek thinkers worked. 

Students will describe how Greek culture still infuences us today. 

HOMEWORK

Choose one of the figures that we talked about in class today. Do some more research about the person and create a poster about their life. Be ready to present your poster to the class in the next session. 

Session 11: The Peloponnesian War

LESSON OBJECTIVES: 

Students will define demagogue, dictatorship, mercenary, Peloponnesian War, plague and truce.

Students will present their posters to the class. 

Students will describe the effect of Athen's desire for more power. 

Students will identify what lead Athens and Sparta to fight a war.

Students will describe what happened during the Peloponnesian War. 

Students will identify who Pericles was and what caused his strategy to fail. 

Students will analyze the Peloponnesian Sea Battle.

Students will identify the events that helped cause Athen's defeat in the Peloponnesian War. 

Students will summarize the result and the long term effect of the Peloponnesian War. 

Students will describe the change the Spartans made to Athen's form of government.

Students will summarize the changes in governing that Athens experienced after the Three Thousand regained control of the city-state.

Students will explain why Athens, Corinth, and Argo formed the Corinthian Alliance after the Peloponnesian War. 

Students will identify who Socrates was and why he was important to ancient history.

HOMEWORK

Choose Your Own Adventure

Students will chose ONE of the projects listed below to complete for homework.

They should be ready to share their project with the class in the next session.

1) At the end of the rule of the Thirty Tyrants, Athenians set about restoring democracy to their city-state. Write a newspaper article that describes this event. Include a headline for your article. Be ready to present your article to the class in the next session. 

OR

2) Write a persuasive composition in which Pericles tries to convince people to leave their land and move into Athens to be safe from Spartan attacks. Be ready to present your persuasive argument to the class in the next session. 

 

Session 12: Alexander the Great Builds An Empire

LESSON OBJECTIVES: 

Students will define Hellenistic Age, multicultural, catapult, and Alexandria.

Students will present their projects to the class. 

Students will explain why the Greek city-states were open to an attack by Philip.

Students will explain how Philip of Macedonia ended the independence of the Greek city-states.

Students will compare how Alexander's plan was similar to his father's plan. 

Students will describe how Alexander built an empire.

Students will identify Alexander's empire on a map.

Students will describe what caused Alexander to stop conquering more of India.

Students will describe how culture changed under Alexander's rule.

Students will summarize the enduring contributions Euclid, Eratosthenes and Hypatia made to learning. 

Students will describe how the Hellenistic culture developed. 

Students will identify what caused the spread of Greek culture in the Hellenistic Age. 

Students will identify who Hypatia was and why she is important to ancient history.

©2019 by Academic Warriors

abruning@academicwarriors.com

432-294-4169