Ancient 

Africa

Ancient Africa

$120 for 4 weeks

Teacher

Allison Bruning 

Subjects

History

Ages

11 - 15  years old

   

Sessions

 

Session 1: Nubia and Kush

LESSON OBJECTIVES: 

Students will define Nubia, Kush, Piankhi, Meroë, smelting, commercial, raw material, import, export, annex and independence.

Students will identify the geographical feature that connected Egypt with Nubia.

Students will describe some of the achievements of Piankhi (Piye).

Students will identify who King Piankhi (aka: Piye) was and why he is important to ancient history.

Students will explain how King Piankhi (Piye) became the Egyptian pharaoh.

Students will explain why the Kushite city of Meroë was an important economic center

Students will identify the natural resources of ancient Nubia.

Students will examine what life was like in an ancient Kushite city.

Students will explain what made Nubia's location ideal for trade.

Students will explain why the Kushite king became an ally of the Hyksos.

HOMEWORK

Complete the Ancient Nubia packet

Session 2: New Kingdom of Kush

LESSON OBJECTIVES: 

Students will define trade network and decipher

Students will discuss their worksheets with the class. 

Students will explain how Dynasty 25 was different from earlier Egyptian dynasties.

Students will describe the event that caused the Kushites to lose control of Egypt.

Students will identify who the Queen of Kush was and why she is important to ancient history.

Students will summarize how trade affected the kingdom of Meroë.

Students will explain what caused Meroë to lose much of its power, importance, and wealth.

HOMEWORK

The Kushites and the Egyptians often placed obelisks at the entrance to their temples. The sides of the obelisks had hieroglyphics or designs. Print one of the designs and create your own obelisk. Be prepared to share your obelisk with the class in the next session.

 

Session 3: The Kingdom of Aksum 

LESSON OBJECTIVES: 

Students will define Aksum, Horn of Africa, Adulis, Ezana and terrace.

Students will present their obelisk to the class. 

Students will explain why trade was important to Aksum.

Students will explain what made Aksum's location ideal for trade.

Students will identify the effect of King Ezana on religion and culture. 

Students will describe some of Aksum's achievements. 

Students will explain how did Aksum farmers increase productivity.

HOMEWORK

Choose Your Own Adventure

Students will chose ONE of the projects listed below to complete for homework.

They should be ready to share their project with the class in the next session.

1) Write a short motto for King Ezana. The motto should say something memorable about him or his reign. Draw a coin showing the motto and sketch Ezana. Be prepared to share your coin and motto with the class in the next session. 

OR

2) Draw a pillar to fill up a poster board. Design drawings to commemorate the achievements of one of the following: your school, your neighborhood, your city, your state or your country. Color your drawings with crayons or markers. Cut out the pillar from the poster board so that it is freestanding. Give a title to the pillar you have design and create a base for the pillar that has the title written upon it. Be prepared to share your pillar with the class in the next session. 

Session 4: West, Central and Southern Africa

LESSON OBJECTIVES: 

Students will define animism, griot, Nok, Bantu and migration.

Students will present their projects to the class. 

Students will describe some of the environments that the people of west, central and southern Africa had to adapt to.

Students will examine the process of desertification.

Students will explain how people lived on the plains of Africa.

Students will identify the role ironworking played in the Nok culture.

Students will contrast the pattern of some early ironworkers and that of the Nok ironworkers.

Students will identify where the Bantu people first lived and where they moved to.

Students will identify the areas of Africa in which the Bantu speakers migrated to.

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